Current Students

Carlos Acosta-Ponce
Kent Emerson
Megan Gibson
Stewart Habig
Omer Kazmi
Margaret Eva Salifu
Ashley Schoppe
Ryan Slesinger
Lindi Smith

Graduate Students Not Featured

Miram Abu’Daqqa, Gidong Aum, Blake Connelly, Hannah Covington, Chris Curran, Michael Dodd, Kelley Friedberg, Ashley Fujibayashi, Linda Hudson, Sungjin Jang, Eliza Killey, Hyundong Ko, Chris Leonard, Holly Mannucci, Grace Markes, Laura McClain, Jina Moon, Annie Page, Helen Patterson, Amy Pezzelle, Mark Rideout, Dayne Riley, Marie Sartain, Laurel Taylor, Laura Thomas, Kathryn Webb-DeStefano, Kate Williams, Joe Willis


Carlos Acosta-Ponce

GSA Treasurer

Special Collections Research Assistant

Carlos is a first-year PhD student at the University of Tulsa. He holds a Bachelor’s degree and a Master’s degree in English Education from the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez, as well as a Master’s degree in English Language and Literature from TU.

Carlos’ research interests are comprehensive and include graphic literature, post-45 American literature, contemporary American literature, popular culture, film studies, adaptation studies, and pedagogy. He is particularly interested in the intersections of literature, popular culture and media, and the comic book culture that emerged during the final years of the Cold War.

He has recently published an article on William Carlos Williams’ Paterson in Revista Atenea, a bilingual, peer-reviewed journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences published by the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez.

 


Megan Gibson PicMegan Gibson

Instructor of English

Zink Hall 320

918-631-2855

megan-gibson@utulsa.edu

My field of study concerns British literature of the long eighteenth-century. I am particularly interested in drama, novels, and interdisciplinary research that considers works of literature alongside theatre and performance studies. My research has tended to focus on the works of Jane Austen and Maria Edgeworth, whose texts I explored in my Master’s dissertation.

Education and degrees earned

  • M.A. 18th c., with merit, Studies, University of Southampton, UK, 2011
  • B.A. summa cum laude, Louisiana Scholars’ College, Northwestern State University, 2010

Areas of Research Focus

  • Eighteenth-Century British literature
  • The Novel
  • Women’s Writing
  • Interdisciplinary studies
  • Theatre and performance studies

Teaching Experience

  • ENGL 1033, Exposition and Argumentation (Fall 2013)

Professional Affiliations

  • Aphra Behn Society
  • Sigma Alpha Iota
  • Phi Kappa Phi
  • American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies

Stewart Habig

thoughtful Stewart

Hello. My name is Stewart Habig, and I am a second year English graduate student at The University of Tulsa. My academic interests involve transatlantic modernism, African American literature/drama, and Irish literature. I am really into Edward P. Jones and Ernest J. Gaines, among others. I’m wrapping up my second (and final) year of course work, and am looking forward to focusing on my exams in 2014. In the meantime, I am employed as the professional writing consultant with The University of Tulsa’s College of Law and also as an editorial assistant with the James Joyce Quarterly journal. I am also serving as the Director of the 2014 EGSA Conference, held April 10-12, 2014. I have previously worked as an English Instructor for non-native students and on the staff of the Modernist Journals Project.

In my previous life I worked as a drafter and designer for a land development company. While civil engineering is fun and engaging, I determined it was not the life for me and went back to school, earning a Bachelors in English from George Mason University in 2010. I graduated with a Master in English from George Mason in 2012, and look forward to earning my final degree from The University of Tulsa sometime around 2016.

Professional Website

Omer Kazmi

GSA President

Instructor of English

Staff, James Joyce Quarterly & Staff,  JMPS

Zink Hall 324

(918) 631-3411

omer-kazmi@utulsa.edu

My research interests lie in 20th century literature, particularly modernism, and, even more particularly than that, British modernism. I also like commas. My dissertation work revolves around the British spy novel and its evolution throughout the 20th century. The influence of high modernism plays a significant role in how the spy novel changes from an offshoot of detective and adventure novels into a genre of its own, with its own set of rules. The spy novel questions itself post-World War II, and that is due to the experimental literature of high modernist writers.

I am a huge fan of James Joyce and his disciples, particularly Samuel Beckett and Anthony Burgess. I enjoy creative writing, various forms of exercise, horses, and general lethargia and procrastination. I am currently the GSA President, having served that role for two years. I was previously EGSA president. I also am Book Review Editor for the James Joyce Quarterly, Assistant Editor for the Journal of Modern Periodical Studies, and I “volunteer” at the Modernist Journals Project. The rest of the stuff is on my CV.

Link to my CV: https://utulsa.academia.edu/OmerKazmi/CurriculumVitae

IMG_20130701_103010-1

Greetings!  My name is Margaret Eva Salifu, and I am a second year Ph.D. student of English Literature at The University of Tulsa. I should complete coursework by the end of spring 2014. My areas of academic interest include African American Literature and Black Atlantic Literature. For my dissertation, I plan to examine what is African about African American Literature. My focus in this study, though, would be on works by African American women writers, such as Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, and Paule Marshall.

Areas of Academic Focus:

  • African American Literature
  • Black Atlantic Literature
  • Creative Writing

Education and Degrees Earned:

  • M.A., North Carolina Central University (2004)
  • B.A., University of Cape Coast-Ghana (1989)

Teaching Experience:

  • ENGL 1033: Exposition and Argument (University of Tulsa)
  • ENGL 1110: English Composition (North Carolina Central University)
  • ENG 112: Literature-based Research (Wake Technical College, NC)
  • BUS 202: Business Communication I (Greenhill College, Accra-Ghana)
  • BUS 400: Business Communication II (Greenhill College, Accra-Ghana)

Professional Affiliations:

  • International English Society (Sigma Tau Delta)
  • National Black Graduate Students Association (NBGSA)

011Marie Sartain

Book Review Editor, James Joyce Quarterly

I am currently studying for comprehensive exams in transatlantic modernism and contemporary American literature, with special focus on visual narrative.

Education and Degrees Earned:

  • B.S. English Language Arts Education, Auburn University 2014
  • M.A. English, University of Tulsa 2016

Teaching Experience

  • ENGL 1004 Intro to College Writing Workshop Leader
  • Writing Center Consultant
  • ENGL 3003 Writing for the Professions (Engineering)
  • Consortium of Overseas Student Teachers (COST) Student Intern – Cologne, Germany

Publication Experience

  • Digital Editor, James Joyce Quarterly
  • Temporary Subscriptions Manager, James Joyce Quarterly

Professional Affiliations

  • South Central MLA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAshley Schoppe

Publicity Manager, Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature

Instructor of English

ashley-schoppe@utulsa.edu

I specialize in British literature of the long eighteenth century. My research interests center on material culture, particularly fashion and clothing of the eighteenth century. My dissertation focuses on literary representations of the anxieties provoked by female clothing, including worries experienced by women and expressed by men. I plan to explore the ways in which broader social and cultural fears lead to the policing of women’s clothing choices and their options regarding dress as presented in literature.
Education and Degrees Earned

  • B.A., Louisiana Scholars’ College at Northwestern State University, 2009
  • M.A., The University of Tulsa, 2011

Areas of Research Focus

  • Eighteenth-Century British Literature
  • Material Culture
  • Women’s and Gender Studies

Teaching & Professional Experience

  • ENGL 1004, Introduction to College Writing
  • ENGL 3003, Writing for the Professions
  • ENGL 2513, Major British Writers I, Teaching Assistant
  • Special Collections Graduate Assistant, McFarlin Library, The University of Tulsa, Fall 2011-May 2012

Professional Affiliations

  • East-Central/American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies
  • Aphra Behn Society


SlespicRyan Slesinger

Instructor of English
Writing Program Assistant

Zink Hall 325

ryan-slesinger@utulsa.edu

My academic interests orbit around religious and spiritual dissent in 19th and 20th Century American literature and culture. Primarily, my focus is on the tendency towards mysticism among American writers as a means of dissent against a spiritual landscape those artists perceived as bland, restricting, and overly materialized. This impulse towards mysticism pervades even the most canonical of texts. In different ways over the course of two centuries, many American authors have drawn on non-American cultural and literary traditions in their resistance to what they perceived to be the continuing materialization of American culture and spirituality. I hope, in my studies to re-examine some of the literature by American writers inclined to dissent with an eye towards considering their renewed relevance at this historical moment. Because contemporary multicultural work in the humanities has begun to reconfigure the margins and centers of American literature, I am hoping that my focus on dissenting American authors and their relationship to non-Western cultures may shed new light on how we imagine what it means to be American.

During my previous appointment as an adjunct-instructor at the University of Oklahoma I designed and taught several courses that utilized my graduate and extracurricular research to address topics in popular culture critically by employing traditional literary and cultural theories and an interdisciplinary methodology. These courses included “Star Wars and the Hero’s Journey,” “The Beatles and the Counterculture,” and “The Grateful Dead’s Evolving American Identity.”

The OU Daily’s coverage of my courses:

More information on my education history, teaching experience, pedagogical training, publications and professional affiliations:

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